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goodideaexchange:

How Philosophy Makes You a Better Leader
“The goal of most executive coaching and leadership development is behavior change—help the individual identify and change the behaviors that are getting in the way of, and reinforce the behaviors associated with, effective leadership.  But what about the beliefs and values that drive behavior?”

goodideaexchange:

How Philosophy Makes You a Better Leader

The goal of most executive coaching and leadership development is behavior change—help the individual identify and change the behaviors that are getting in the way of, and reinforce the behaviors associated with, effective leadership.  But what about the beliefs and values that drive behavior?

— 2 days ago with 27 notes

heather805:

First day in Raleigh…. event prep! Started off the day with juice from Raleigh Raw and a lesson in driving the ELF! Environmentally friendly transpo for us to use around the city. Lunch at Jimmy Vs (location check and yummy salad- blackened petit sirloin, pear tomatoes, field greens, slivered onions, scallions, blue cheese crumbles and balsamic) Ran errands for local goodies, videri chocolate factory, the Raleigh wine shop and finished the welcome baskets.
Last stop Joule coffee for a little iced pick me up before heading to the hotel to get ready for tonight.

— 1 week ago with 1 note

heather805:

Citrix Raleigh Grand Opening Ribbon Cutting

— 1 week ago with 1 note

heather805:

'Smeared Skies' more awe inspiring time lapsed photos by Toronto photographer Matt Molloy

— 1 week ago with 1 note
Salesforce reveals Wave, its big, bad analytics cloud | VentureBeat | Big Data | by Jordan Novet →

Marc Benioff wasn’t kidding around.

The Salesforce.com chief executive and co-founder dropped a hint of something called an Analytics Cloud last month when he tweeted out a picture of a draft agenda for the company’s Dreamforce conference this week. Today, Salesforce is taking the wraps off a major new cloud-based application under that moniker, one that will let businesspeople easily explore and visualize the data their companies keep inside Salesforce and several other sources.

The new service from Salesforce, whose mobile app is already available for iOS, amounts to a major step forward for the enterprise software, not only because it expands the company’s reach beyond the sales, marketing and service software categories but also because the release changes the dynamics of Salesforce’s relationships with partners that have offered business-intelligence (BI) or data analytics capabilities in the past. Some are formally announcing partnerships; others aren’t. In any case, it’s a big day in data world.

Not that the arrival of Wave, as the new software is named, comes as a surprise. Salesforce bought BI software startup EdgeSpring last year. And Salesforce did call on EdgeSpring’s technology to provide search-indexing capabilities for Wave, Anna Rosenman, director of the analytics cloud, said in an interview with VentureBeat.

But Salesforce also poured lots of its own effort into building a completely new product that’s intuitive enough for any person to use — just like such popular games as Angry Birds, Candy Crush Saga, and Farmville. The idea was to make data actionable.

“It’s not to be sitting on the shelf, static, siloed, and away from individuals,” Rosenman said. “It’s here to inform us, so we can make the right decisions going forward.”

At the same time, Salesforce wanted the service to pack serious power. That way, it’d be possible for an analyst at a big company to pull up millions of rows of data and apply several filters before making elegant charts to share with colleagues.

Users can click on the individual components in Wave’s visualizations to explore subsets; they’re far more than just pretty images, Rosenman said. And such work takes just a few mouse clicks or screen taps.

“I didn’t need to look through a manual to go through this,” she said during a demo of the service.

The Salesforce Wave analytics cloud software can run on mobile devices and desktop computers.
Above: The Salesforce Wave analytics cloud software can run on mobile devices and desktop computers.
Image Credit: Salesforce
Over at Forbes, writer Ben Kepes doesn’t see Wave as a business-intelligence tool. Rather, he thinks of it as “a ‘bottom up’ attempt to make line-of-business workers start thinking about how analytics is applicable to them.” Meanwhile Larry Dignan, whose report on ZDNet includes a few screen shots of Wave in action, writes, “Salesforce has five clouds and Wave represents the sixth. In the years to come, Wave could be the most important of the bunch.”

Salesforce is announcing that it’s teaming up with several early-stage companies in the predictive-analytics market: 6Sense, C9, Fliptop, Gainsight, Lattice Engines, Predixion, and Wise.io.

The choice of partnering rather than baking in predictive capability shows Salesforce doesn’t want to completely turn off its ecosystem of companies that offer to crunch data from Salesforce and assist sales people in figuring out which leads to focus on.

The standalone Wave service costs $250 per month for each person who imports data sets — “builders,” in Salesforce parlance — and $125 per month for each person working with available data, or “explorers.” The Wave mobile app comes free of charge.

Plenty of companies pay for BI in the cloud. Now they’ll have one more choice. Companies that already run Salesforce might well be compelled to look at Salesforce’s take on BI. It’ll be fascinating to see if Wave ends up becoming a sort of gateway drug, leading companies to buy Wave first and then sign up for Salesforce’s other offerings.

More information:

Salesforce.com
With more than 100,000 customers, salesforce.com is the enterprise cloud computing company that is leading the shift to the social enterprise. Social enterprises leverage social, mobile and open cloud technologies to put customers at t… read more »

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— 1 week ago
A Brief History Of Tesla | TechCrunch →

When Tesla went public in 2010, it became the first American car company to do so since Ford Motor Company in 1956. Since then, Tesla’s stock has soared as the company keeps rolling out new features and models while simultaneously capturing the imagination of a curious public. What follows is a brief history of Tesla starting at its founding not by Elon Musk, but Martin Eberhard and Marc Tarpenning in July 2003.

— 1 week ago
A Cute Camera That Could Revive the Polaroid Brand

There’s a common reaction when people first see Polaroid’s new action camera: “Most people say it’s cute,” says Robert Brunner, the founder and president of Ammunition, the design firm responsible for the Beats by Dre headphones. Normally, “cute” would be considered the sort of vague, dashed-off descriptor that designers hate to hear, on par with “neat” or “cool.” In this case, though, cute was as good of a reaction as Brunner and Polaroid could have hoped for. “We wanted to position the product to really be fun and accessible and easy and simple, not intimidating,” he says. “Thats why when people say it’s cute, I’m happy.”

With the Cube, Polaroid is entering into a crowded market. GoPro has already established itself as the reigning action cam for a very specific type of person; namely, adrenaline junkies who jump out of planes for fun.

But Polaroid CEO Scott Hardy believes there’s a whole untapped market of camera users who would rather film their flight from inside a plane than outside of one. “From our perspective, we felt like we really needed to grow the overall pie,” says Hardy. “When we talked to Ammunition, we were very specific. We said to them, ‘We need something that’s unique and differentiated that addresses a much broader demographic.’”

Polaroid’s customers skew female–about 70 percent— and they sit on either side of an increasingly large age gap. There’s the old-school Polaroid lovers from the company’s heyday. Then there are the youngin’s who tote around the instant film to document BBQs and wild nights out. Cube is aimed squarely at the latter.

Smart Industrial Design
This insight—that there’s a market for a camera that captures more casual action—was the driving idea behind Ammunition’s design. The cube sits at a serendipitous 35 millimeters all around; it feels at home in your hand, the way a pair of dice nestle nicely into your palm. Its edges are softly rounded, and if you look closely each of the sides is slightly rounded too—an attempt to add structural integrity to what’s essentially a cube of glass and electronics.

It’s an unconventional form factor for a camera, which is a risk when you look at the backlash towards other adventurous camera designs like Lytro’s first light field camera. “We really felt it was extremely important for us to do something entirely unique,” says Brunner. “It’s an interesting time to be a designer. We’re going back and redesigning all kinds of stuff we never thought we would…there’s this line you have to walk because people understand certain things.” Gregoire Vandenbussche, a senior designer at Ammunition, who worked on the cube, says his main inspiration was the old-school pink erasers we used during school. “When you use it, it kind of wears down and it’s very friendly, and you like to hold it in your hand and fidget with it,” he explains. “We wanted that sort of quality to it.”

This benefit of this softness is two-fold: First, the cube feels warm and personal, like a tiny gadget you feel a pet-like affinity towards. It’s also protective. The camera has respectable guts; it’s not a GoPro, but it takes high-quality video at 720p or 1080p resolution with a wide angle lens that’s slightly recessed into the cube for protection. To switch back and forth, you unscrew a little door in the back; that’s also where you insert your SD card. You press the big button on top once to take a still image, twice for a video. It’s easy to balance the Cube between two fingers, or snap it onto something metallic using the magnet at the bottom (there’s also a line of accessories).To view your photos and footage, you plug the camera into your computer via a micro USB.

It’s exceedingly simple to use. Or at least simple enough that if you hand it around at a party, your friends would quickly gather how it works. Which is the entire point. The Cube’s photos might not come with the built-in gauzy filter of photos from yesteryear, but if Polaroid has its way, it just might become the instant film of the 21st century.

http://www.wired.com/2014/10/cute-camera-revive-polaroid-brand/?mbid=social_fb

A Cute Camera That Could Revive the Polaroid Brand

There’s a common reaction when people first see Polaroid’s new action camera: “Most people say it’s cute,” says Robert Brunner, the founder and president of Ammunition, the design firm responsible for the Beats by Dre headphones. Normally, “cute” would be considered the sort of vague, dashed-off descriptor that designers hate to hear, on par with “neat” or “cool.” In this case, though, cute was as good of a reaction as Brunner and Polaroid could have hoped for. “We wanted to position the product to really be fun and accessible and easy and simple, not intimidating,” he says. “Thats why when people say it’s cute, I’m happy.”

With the Cube, Polaroid is entering into a crowded market. GoPro has already established itself as the reigning action cam for a very specific type of person; namely, adrenaline junkies who jump out of planes for fun.

But Polaroid CEO Scott Hardy believes there’s a whole untapped market of camera users who would rather film their flight from inside a plane than outside of one. “From our perspective, we felt like we really needed to grow the overall pie,” says Hardy. “When we talked to Ammunition, we were very specific. We said to them, ‘We need something that’s unique and differentiated that addresses a much broader demographic.’”

Polaroid’s customers skew female–about 70 percent— and they sit on either side of an increasingly large age gap. There’s the old-school Polaroid lovers from the company’s heyday. Then there are the youngin’s who tote around the instant film to document BBQs and wild nights out. Cube is aimed squarely at the latter.

Smart Industrial Design
This insight—that there’s a market for a camera that captures more casual action—was the driving idea behind Ammunition’s design. The cube sits at a serendipitous 35 millimeters all around; it feels at home in your hand, the way a pair of dice nestle nicely into your palm. Its edges are softly rounded, and if you look closely each of the sides is slightly rounded too—an attempt to add structural integrity to what’s essentially a cube of glass and electronics.

It’s an unconventional form factor for a camera, which is a risk when you look at the backlash towards other adventurous camera designs like Lytro’s first light field camera. “We really felt it was extremely important for us to do something entirely unique,” says Brunner. “It’s an interesting time to be a designer. We’re going back and redesigning all kinds of stuff we never thought we would…there’s this line you have to walk because people understand certain things.” Gregoire Vandenbussche, a senior designer at Ammunition, who worked on the cube, says his main inspiration was the old-school pink erasers we used during school. “When you use it, it kind of wears down and it’s very friendly, and you like to hold it in your hand and fidget with it,” he explains. “We wanted that sort of quality to it.”

This benefit of this softness is two-fold: First, the cube feels warm and personal, like a tiny gadget you feel a pet-like affinity towards. It’s also protective. The camera has respectable guts; it’s not a GoPro, but it takes high-quality video at 720p or 1080p resolution with a wide angle lens that’s slightly recessed into the cube for protection. To switch back and forth, you unscrew a little door in the back; that’s also where you insert your SD card. You press the big button on top once to take a still image, twice for a video. It’s easy to balance the Cube between two fingers, or snap it onto something metallic using the magnet at the bottom (there’s also a line of accessories).To view your photos and footage, you plug the camera into your computer via a micro USB.

It’s exceedingly simple to use. Or at least simple enough that if you hand it around at a party, your friends would quickly gather how it works. Which is the entire point. The Cube’s photos might not come with the built-in gauzy filter of photos from yesteryear, but if Polaroid has its way, it just might become the instant film of the 21st century.

http://www.wired.com/2014/10/cute-camera-revive-polaroid-brand/?mbid=social_fb

— 2 weeks ago
GoToTraining is good. GoToTraining AND GoToMeeting together? It’s like an awesome mix tape! Limited time offer on both. http://bit.ly/1rJQDnc

GoToTraining is good. GoToTraining AND GoToMeeting together? It’s like an awesome mix tape! Limited time offer on both. http://bit.ly/1rJQDnc

— 2 weeks ago with 1 note
#gotowebinar  #tech  #technology  #Citrix  #GoToMeeting  #BOGO  #business  #videoconferencing  #saas 
"

So many times, we make decisions about who we are – who we want to be, who we aspire to be, what we aspire to do – based on what we believe are our own self-imposed limitations, not those of the world. And we live inside those self-imposed limitations, without any sense that we can actually expand [them] if we let ourselves.

[…]

I don’t think it’s a matter of overcoming [our] fears — fears are fears, and we have a reptilian brain which we can’t simply turn on and turn off… It is critical to live despite those fears – if you’re waiting for the fears to go away, they’re not. You have to make a decision that you want [what you want] more than you want to be held back or self-protected by those fears.

"
— 3 weeks ago with 465 notes
"Don’t do something just for the money. Money is a side effect of persistence. You persist in things you are interested in. Explore your interests. Then persist. Then enjoy all the side effects."
James Altucher (via mybizon)

(via goodideaexchange)

— 3 weeks ago with 143 notes
The Tech Rapture? Why Tuesday Sept. 9 is the nexus of all things high-tech | VentureBeat | Gadgets | by Dean Takahashi →

Everything is happening on Tuesday Sept. 9 in the world of technology and gaming. It feels like a nexus of events that are somehow all tied together.

And while days like this used to seem busy for just tech journalists or Silicon Valley, now the whole world is watching. I think of it as the Rapture of technology, or the final comeuppance of four decades of Moore’s Law and the convergence of computing, communications, and mobile technology. Let’s hope it’s not going to be a big disappointment. With billions of people on the internet, the audience for this day’s events will be so much bigger.

It is, of course, going to be a big day for Apple news. At an event in Cupertino, Calif. near its headquarters, Apple is expected to announce the iPhone 6 with larger screens and, if we’re lucky, it will also unveil its new iWatch, a wearable smart device that measures your fitness activity and helps improve your health. This alone is reason enough for every other company in the world to cancel their press announcements until another day.

Intel, meanwhile, is staging its big Intel Developers Forum event at the Moscone West convention center in San Francisco. Brian Krzanich, chief executive of Intel, will give his keynote at 9 am, just before Apple CEO Tim Cook is due to take the stage in Cupertino.

Krzanich is expected to talk about Grantley, the code-name for the newest family of server chips, and chips for other devices as well. Krzanich is also expected to say more about wearable devices, as he announced in January at the Consumer Electronics Show that Intel would launch its own fashion-forward wearables.

Smaller startups like Basis Science pioneered this market, and Google pushed it forward with Glass. But now the big titans are coming in, as the fundamentals behind the gee-whiz technology are now ready for mainstream applications. Moore’s Law, or the 1964 prediction by Intel chairman emeritus Gordon Moore that the number of transistors on a chip will double every couple of years, makes it easier and easier to build faster, smarter, and more efficient tech gadgets.

I mean, if wearables like Glass seem a little clunky now, just wait a little bit and they’ll get better. Intel bought Basis Science and it is churning out its own line of wearables, and it is making the components that go into them as well. Rival Samsung, Google, and Amazon are all expected to compete as well in wearables.

Intel is in the interesting position of supplying components and then making the end devices too. It really should be supplying Apple with chips, but Apple doesn’t want to be enslaved to Intel. So these tech titans seem to go out of their way to mess up each other’s press events (with Apple emerging victorious because of its cool cachet beating Intel’s nerdiness). They should be working together in a kind of giant ecosystem built for the benefit of consumers. But nobody wants to concede the day and let the other guy have all of the media attention.

In gaming, there will also be a comeuppance. Activision Blizzard will publish Destiny, the massively multiplayer online first-person shooter game created by Halo developer Bungie. On Sept. 9, Activision will start delivering preordered games and selling the packaged titles in stores. Some analysts are expecting that Destiny will outsell Call of Duty this year and become one of the best-selling games of all time. At $60 a copy, you can bet it will be a better bargain than an iWatch or an iPhone 6. Wouldn’t it be cool if all of the players gathered in the virtual world of Destiny and did a salute to Apple in some way? But Cook would never notice. He’s not a gamer.

TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2014, the startup conference from tech media site TechCrunch, is also going to be in full swing on Tuesday. It formally kicks off on Monday, but Tuesday will feature talks with Salesforce.com’s Marc Benioff and other tech luminaries who either didn’t get an invitation to Apple’s event or just didn’t care about it or had admins who forgot to check the big Rapture day on the calendar. We live and breathe startups, so we’d be delighted if some small tech company managed to make some news that steals some of the limelight from the tech titans. But don’t bet on it.

Another entity that didn’t get the memo about Apple’s big event was the Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association, which will hold its Super Mobility Week in Las Vegas starting Sept. 9. Normally, when an entire industry stages an event, you figure that will get all the attention. But compared to Apple, these guys are the underdogs.

There are even expectations that Alibaba plans to file for its initial public offering during this week. The Chinese e-commerce giant is expected to raise $26 billion and begin trading this month in the largest IPO in stock market history. That is quite possibly the only thing that could be more significant in a financial sense than Apple showing off a little hunk of plastic and metal.

It’s going to be a challenge, but VentureBeat is going to try to have someone at all of these events, or at least covering them and what they mean from afar. Wish us luck, and come back and read updates about everything that is happening on Tuesday and beyond at VentureBeat. I wish that someone would tell me it means that all of these things are happening at once. It seems like the end of the world, or maybe the beginning of one.

I hope I have established, by pointing out these coincidences, that Sept. 9 is indeed going to be the Tech Rapture. We’re all going to be in gadget heaven.

All I can say is thank the Lord. My own event, GamesBeat 2014, is the only thing happening in the universe on Sept. 15-16.

— 1 month ago with 1 note

heather805:

Work cocktail party and dinner in the private lounge on field level at Levi’s Stadium, home of the San Francisco 49ers.
Tour and view of the Citrix Owners Club Lounge… Inaugural game this week!

— 1 month ago with 1 note
Silicon Valley’s 49ers show off the ‘best high-tech stadium in the world’ 

In the midst of Silicon Valley, the San Francisco 49ers NFL football team now have what could be the best high-tech stadium in the world.

Levi’s Stadium, located next to the Great America theme park in Santa Clara, Calif., was built in the modern era of mobile technology. It’s been called a smart stadium, and it’s full of gadgets. It took about two years to build at a cost of $1.2 billion.

The stadium has high-tech amenities like fast Wi-Fi connectivity and mobile apps that are accessible from any seat in the stadium. I’ve been to the stadium twice now, once during the San Diego Chargers preseason game, and again in a tour led by 49er and Comcast executives. The press on the tour got to see the technical guts of the stadium.

Al Guido, the chief operating officer of the 49ers, said the technology is aimed at enhancing the fan experience and not taking away from the “stars” on the gridiron. But during a six-hour experience, the actual playing time on the field is relatively short. And these days, it’s not an option to be unplugged from your smartphone for that long, Guido said.

“When we talk about tech, we never want to take away from the hero feature, the 11 guys down on the field,” Guido said. “Tech has to be ancillary to what is happening on the field. We didn’t want people staring at their phones and not making noise. We need a home field advantage. What we can do is build the infrastructure and tech to enhance the experience.”

I was able to watch the Chargers game from the owner’s club suite (all sponsored by tech firm Citrix) that belongs to venture capitalist Rick Thompson. He hosted 18 executives from Chinese mobile game and tech companies, as well as a bunch of local game company leaders. They weren’t all interested in watching their first football game, but everybody seemed impressed with the amenities and the tech. You could look down on the field, or at the 4K TV in the suite. There are 170 luxury suites, each able to accommodate approximately 25 guests, in the 1.85 million square feet stadium.

“This is the best tech stadium in the world,” said Tim Bajarin, president and analyst at Creative Strategies and a writer for Time. I haven’t been to every stadium in the world, but I’m not going to argue with Bajarin…..

http://venturebeat.com/2014/09/07/silicon-valleys-49ers-show-off-the-best-high-tech-stadium-in-the-world-photo-gallery/

I was there about a month ago and took a tour. Amazing stadium!

Silicon Valley’s 49ers show off the ‘best high-tech stadium in the world’

In the midst of Silicon Valley, the San Francisco 49ers NFL football team now have what could be the best high-tech stadium in the world.

Levi’s Stadium, located next to the Great America theme park in Santa Clara, Calif., was built in the modern era of mobile technology. It’s been called a smart stadium, and it’s full of gadgets. It took about two years to build at a cost of $1.2 billion.

The stadium has high-tech amenities like fast Wi-Fi connectivity and mobile apps that are accessible from any seat in the stadium. I’ve been to the stadium twice now, once during the San Diego Chargers preseason game, and again in a tour led by 49er and Comcast executives. The press on the tour got to see the technical guts of the stadium.

Al Guido, the chief operating officer of the 49ers, said the technology is aimed at enhancing the fan experience and not taking away from the “stars” on the gridiron. But during a six-hour experience, the actual playing time on the field is relatively short. And these days, it’s not an option to be unplugged from your smartphone for that long, Guido said.

“When we talk about tech, we never want to take away from the hero feature, the 11 guys down on the field,” Guido said. “Tech has to be ancillary to what is happening on the field. We didn’t want people staring at their phones and not making noise. We need a home field advantage. What we can do is build the infrastructure and tech to enhance the experience.”

I was able to watch the Chargers game from the owner’s club suite (all sponsored by tech firm Citrix) that belongs to venture capitalist Rick Thompson. He hosted 18 executives from Chinese mobile game and tech companies, as well as a bunch of local game company leaders. They weren’t all interested in watching their first football game, but everybody seemed impressed with the amenities and the tech. You could look down on the field, or at the 4K TV in the suite. There are 170 luxury suites, each able to accommodate approximately 25 guests, in the 1.85 million square feet stadium.

“This is the best tech stadium in the world,” said Tim Bajarin, president and analyst at Creative Strategies and a writer for Time. I haven’t been to every stadium in the world, but I’m not going to argue with Bajarin…..

http://venturebeat.com/2014/09/07/silicon-valleys-49ers-show-off-the-best-high-tech-stadium-in-the-world-photo-gallery/

I was there about a month ago and took a tour. Amazing stadium!

— 1 month ago